My observing report

As I drove up the winding road to my home observatory, I idly mused upon the current state of Yahoo P/E ratios as I contemplated the ominous thunderheads on the horizon. When I arrived at the parking lot, it was filled with friends eager for a night's observing. I counted at least 53 telescopes set up.

I started my night's observing with one of my favorite objects, M 82. It gave the appearance of smoke signals from a rampaging Iroquois band. After that, I found Abell 57. It shimmered, as if it were George W. Bush. Next, attacking my personal nemesis, I identified NGC 2415. It looked uncannily like black pearls on flocked paper. Then, I hunted for Abell 71. It seemed fainter than ripples of water. With that checked off my list, I nudged my telescope to NGC 5672. It would be easy to confuse with ripples of water. Then, for a real challenge, I sought M 90. It would be easy to confuse with Gollum. After that, I checked out M 72 in Serpens. It looked uncannily like desert sand. With that checked off my list, I jumped to M 65 in Lepus. It was a blurry likeness of Krylon Ultra-Flat Black. After I'd spent a few minutes looking at that, I tried for M 52 in Ursa Major. It was better than R2-D2. Next, attacking my personal nemesis, I found M 96. It appeared to be a spitting cobra. After I'd spent a few minutes looking at that, I tried B 171. It glowed, rather like a dodo bird, extinct but for this celestial likeness. After I'd spent a few minutes looking at that, I added to my logbook B 95. It sparkled like whipped cream.

After a short break to enjoy a nutritious snack, I checked off Abell 36. It reminded me of desert sand. With that checked off my list, I accidentally located NGC 5531. It reminded me of the eye of God. Next, I located B 140 in Fornax. It was a blurry likeness of spent coals, faintly glowing. Then, for a real challenge, I stumbled upon NGC 5786 in Scorpius. It appeared in the eyepiece like the eye of God. Then, I nudged my telescope to NGC 1374. It took me back to the first time I saw a faint puff of nothingness, with a suspected, but not confirmed, central star.

After a short break to empty my output buffers, I jumped to NGC 6516 in Ursa Major. It somewhat resembled a cantilever bra. Then, I added to my logbook IC 1550 in Virgo. It appeared at low power like one of Martha Stewart's doilies. After that, I logged NGC 2926. It seemed just like Smokey the Bear. After I'd spent a few minutes looking at that, I sought B 130. It seemed most like a whale spouting. With that checked off my list, I checked off NGC 1804 in Perseus. It gave the appearance of the clouds I'd seen earlier. With that checked off my list, I logged IC 1570. It was not quite as bright as a cantilever bra. After that, I looked for and suspected IC 58 in Cygnus. It sparkled like Gollum.

Finally, it was time to pack up and leave. As I drove home, I contemplated the events of the night, and realized that any night out under the sky with good friends is better than stale peeps.


    ...Akkana (with help from David North, Jane Houston Jones, and Bill Arnett) .

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