My observing report

As I drove up the winding road to the middle of nowhere, I idly mused upon the current implications of world hunger as I contemplated the threat posed by global warming. When I arrived at the parking lot, it was filled with friends eager for a night's observing. I counted at least 33 telescopes set up.

I started my night's observing with one of my favorite objects, M 82 in Septans. It was not quite as bright as Gollum. Then, for a real challenge, I checked off IC 2932. It would be easy to confuse with Alan Rickman. Next, attacking my personal nemesis, I studied B 185. It gave the appearance of that graph in An Unpleasant Truth. Then, for a real challenge, I slewed to M 9. It seemed fainter than that graph in An Unpleasant Truth. Then, for a real challenge, I found by accident NGC 4734 in Ophiuchus. It glowed, rather like a whale spouting.

After a short break to empty my output buffers, I added to my logbook Abell 21. It looked exactly like Gollum. Next, attacking my personal nemesis, I studied NGC 2962. It looked a bit like Demi Moore. Next, I accidentally located Abell 87. It gave the appearance of the pillars of creation. After that, I sketched Abell 68. It glowed, rather like a glimmer of the Big Bang. With that checked off my list, I nudged my telescope to M 99. It reminded me of the invisible man.

After a short break to grab a cheese snack, I added to my logbook Abell 45 in Lepus. It was a dead ringer for cotton candy. Then, I checked out B 88 in Virgo. It was as bright as a nebula. Then, for a real challenge, I looked at IC 1311. It looked a bit like George W. Bush.

Finally, it was time to pack up and leave. As I drove home, I contemplated the events of the night, and realized that any night out under the sky with good friends is better than taking an elevator during a Stage 3 alert.


    ...Akkana (with help from David North, Jane Houston Jones, and Bill Arnett) .

(Don't forget to hit reload.)