My observing report

As I drove up the winding road to Dinosaur Point, I idly mused upon the current implications of the human spirit as I contemplated the night's aurora display. When I arrived at the parking lot, it was filled with friends eager for a night's observing. I counted at least 56 telescopes set up.

I started my night's observing with one of my favorite objects, M 52. It looked like cotton on velvet. Next, attacking my personal nemesis, I located NGC 3724 in Canis Major. It appeared in the eyepiece like Smokey the Bear. After that, I stumbled upon M 92 in Sagittarius. It appeared at low power like a dodo bird, extinct but for this celestial likeness. With that checked off my list, I found B 103 in Canis Major. It was better than a waterfall. Then, I identified IC 537 in an unknown constellation that looked like a toaster. It seemed just like a dodo bird, extinct but for this celestial likeness. After that, I nudged my telescope to NGC 3538. It appeared to be cream being swirled into hot coffee. With that checked off my list, I checked out NGC 5391. It was as bright as cream being swirled into hot coffee. Next, I showed some guests M 65. It looked uncannily like its Hubble photograph. With that checked off my list, I hunted for M 103 in Sculptor. It glowed, rather like Smokey the Bear. With that checked off my list, I identified IC 1378. It looked uncannily like diamonds on light grey velvet. With that checked off my list, I showed some guests M 87. It was even more difficult than a cantilever bra. Next, I accidentally located Abell 68. It appeared at low power like a spider. Then, I tried B 109. It was like a whale spouting. Next, I logged NGC 6875. It gave the appearance of cotton on velvet. Then, I added to my logbook M 47. It was not quite as bright as Demi Moore. Then, I jumped to Abell 49. It seemed most like an inflamed monkey butt. With that checked off my list, I star-hopped to M 28. It would be easy to confuse with the face of God. Then, for a real challenge, I checked off NGC 3190 in the western sky. It looked a bit like Dubya. With that checked off my list, I nudged my telescope to Abell 17. It appeared in the eyepiece like a little triangle. After I'd spent a few minutes looking at that, I logged M 14 in Canis Major. It was like nothing I'd ever seen before. After that, I added to my logbook B 470 in that confusing part of Virgo. It compared favorably with spent coals, faintly glowing. After I'd spent a few minutes looking at that, I star-hopped to M 31. It was easy, just like diamonds on light grey velvet.

Finally, it was time to pack up and leave. As I drove home, I contemplated the events of the night, and realized that any night out under the sky with good friends is better than a 24-hour 007 marathon.


    ...Akkana (with help from David North, Jane Houston Jones, and Bill Arnett) .

(Don't forget to hit reload.)