My observing report

As I drove up the winding road to the Peak, I idly mused upon the impact upon modern astronomy of tight underwear as I contemplated the El Nino weather patterns. When I arrived at the parking lot, it was filled with friends eager for a night's observing. I counted at least 8 telescopes set up.

I started my night's observing with one of my favorite objects, M 94 in Gemini. It was better than lumpy darkness. Next, attacking my personal nemesis, I nudged my telescope to IC 3689. It was even more difficult than Gollum. Next, I sought B 69. It was even more difficult than George W. Bush. Then, for a real challenge, I tried M 110 in Ophiuchus. It was as bright as Smokey the Bear. Then, I looked at M 36 in Hydra. It looked uncannily like a glimmer of the Big Bang.

After a short break to empty my output buffers, I nudged my telescope to M 92. It took me back to the first time I saw Demi Moore. Then, I accidentally located NGC 3620. It appeared in the eyepiece like that graph in An Unpleasant Truth. After I'd spent a few minutes looking at that, I looked for and suspected Abell 51. It seemed just like the exhaust from a diesel Suburban. Next, I found Abell 85. It seemed most like the eye of God. Next, attacking my personal nemesis, I showed some guests NGC 2649 in Lepus. It looked like dandruff on black satin pajamas. Then, for a real challenge, I star-hopped to NGC 5408. It was better than cotton on velvet. After that, I star-hopped to M 55 in Orion. It took me back to the first time I saw a glimmer of the Big Bang. Then, I sketched NGC 2298 in Cygnus. It seemed just like R2-D2.

Finally, it was time to pack up and leave. As I drove home, I contemplated the events of the night, and realized that any night out under the sky with good friends is better than ebola.


    ...Akkana (with help from David North, Jane Houston Jones, and Bill Arnett) .

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