Etch: Blacklisting Modules, Udev, and Firewire Networking (Shallow Thoughts)

Akkana's Musings on Open Source, Science, and Nature.

Tue, 15 May 2007

Etch: Blacklisting Modules, Udev, and Firewire Networking

The new Debian Etch installation on my laptop was working pretty well. But it had one weirdness: the ethernet card was on eth1, not eth0. ifconfig -a revealed that eth0 was ... something else, with no IP address configured and a really long MAC address. What was it?

Poking around dmesg revealed that it was related to the IEEE 1394 and the eth1394 module. It was firewire networking.

This laptop, being a Vaio, does have a built-in firewire interface (Sony calls it i.Link). The Etch installer, when it detected no network present, had noted that it was "possible, though unlikely" that I might want to use firewire instead, and asked whether to enable it. I declined.

Yet the installed system ended up with firewire networking not only installed, but taking the first network slot, ahead of any network cards. It didn't get in the way of functionality, but it was annoying and clutters the output whenever I type ifconfig -a. Probably took up a little extra boot time and system resources, too. I wanted it gone.

Easier said than done, as it turns out.

I could see two possible approaches.

  1. Figure out who was setting it to eth1, and tell it to ignore the device instead.
  2. Blacklist the kernel module, so it couldn't load at all.

I begain with approach 1. The obvious culprit, of course, was udev. (I had already ruled out hal, by removing it, rebooting and observing that the bogus eth0 was still there.) Poking around /etc/udev/rules.d revealed the file where the naming was happening: z25_persistent-net.rules.

It looks like all you have to do is comment out the two lines for the firewire device in that file. Don't believe it. Upon reboot, udev sees the firewire devices and says "Oops! persistent-net.rules doesn't have a rule for this device. I'd better add one!" and you end up with both your commented-out line, plus a brand new uncommented line. No help.

Where is that controlled? From another file, z45_persistent-net-generator.rules. So all you have to do is edit that file and comment out the lines, right?

Well, no. The firewire lines in that file merely tell udev how to add a comment when it updates z25_persistent-net.rules. It still updates the file, it just doesn't comment it as clearly.

There are some lines in z45_persistent-net-generator.rules whose comments say they're disabling particular devices, by adding a rule GOTO="persistent_net_generator_end". But adding that in the firewire device lines caused the boot process to hang. There may be a way to ignore a device from this file, but I haven't found it, nor any documentation on how this system works.

Defeated, I switched to approach 2: prevent the module from loading at all. I never expect to use firewire networking, so it's no loss. And indeed, there are lots of other modules loaded I'd like to blacklist, since they represent hardware this machine doesn't have. So it would be nice to learn how.

I had a vague memory of there having been a file with a name like /etc/modules.blacklist some time back in the Pliocene. But apparently no such file exists any more. I did find /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist, which looked promising; but the comment at the beginning of that file says

# This file lists modules which will not be loaded as the result of
# alias expsnsion, with the purpose of preventing the hotplug subsystem
# to load them. It does not affect autoloading of modules by the kernel.
Okay, sounds like this file isn't what I wanted. (And ... hotplug? I thought that was long gone, replaced by udev scripts.) I tried it anyway. Sure enough, not what I wanted.

I fiddled with several other approaches before Debian diva Erinn Clark found this helpful page. I created a file called /etc/modprobe.d/00local and added this line to it:

install eth1394 /bin/true
and on the next boot, the module was no longer loaded, and no longer showed up as a bogus ethernet device. Hurray!

This /etc/modprobe.d/00local technique probably doesn't bear examining too closely. It has "hack" written all over it. But if that's the only way to blacklist problematic modules, I guess it's better than nothing.

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[ 18:10 May 15, 2007    More linux | permalink to this entry ]